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Brains, Bones and Behavior Training Kits

These training kits have been created to assist anyone in training their dog.

Our kits cover the most asked about topics in the pet dog world and all that is needed to train a service dog for your disability.


Kits include training tools like target sticks, marker flags, marker spots, cotton pads/rolls/swabs, light switches, portable door bells, deep pressure training pillow, snake skin, marker ribbons, and many other items depending on which kit you purchase.

Because we buy the kit items in bulk, your cost is much lower than if you purchsed all the necessary items you would need.


Kits Available

All kits are $65 plus shipping and sales tax.  Book and kit will arrive separately.

Psychiatric

Psychiatric Service Dogs are currently the last type of service dog to be recognized by the American’s With Disabilities Act. It was thought before this that Emotional Support Animals and Psychiatric dogs were the same thing and in some ways are still considered the same or nearly the same by the Airlines and the Veterans Administration. Yet our Veterans with PTSD have been benefiting from these dogs for at least a decade.
Psychiatric service dogs perform a variety of tasks for their handler.

Pushing the button on automatic doors, retrieving dropped or out of reach items, answering the phone, pulling a wheelchair, fetching a cane, helping to remove clothing and many other tasks. One of the most common tasks I personally have trained in a Psychiatric assistance dog is balance and staying upright. There are many reasons why someone would need a dog to help keep them upright and being overweight is the least of those reasons.

Many dogs serve as a brace for people who are ambulatory but suffer from blood pressure issues (POTS) and suffer from balance and strength issues. A Psychiatric Service dog can tug open and close doors and drawers, turn lights on and off, and summon help by finding another person in the house. In public, the Psychiatric Service dog is often an invisible helper, keeping their handler upright, on a straight path, or avoiding obstacles. 

Mobility and Assistance

First are Guide Dogs, then the most thought of service dog is most likely a mobility assistance dog.Hearing dogs are actually more prevalent and have been around longer, but hearing dogs are usually invisible.I remember seeing my first hearing dog in a shelter in Florida in 1992.
Mobility assistance dogs perform a variety of tasks for their handler. Pushing the button on automatic doors, retrieving dropped or out of reach items, answering the phone, pulling a wheelchair, fetching a cane, helping to remove clothing and many other tasks.

One of the most common tasks I personally have trained in a mobility assistance dog is balance and staying upright. There are many reasons why someone would need a dog to help keep them upright and being overweight is the least of those reasons. Many dogs serve as a brace for people who are ambulatory but suffer from blood pressure issues (POTS) and suffer from balance and strength issues.

A mobility assistance dog can tug open and close doors and drawers, turn lights on and off, and summon help by finding another person in the house. In public, the mobility assistance dog is often an invisible helper, keeping their handler upright, on a straight path, or avoiding obstacles.
A service dog is a trained to perform various tasks for their human partners who have a disability. These trained tasks are directly related to the handler’s disability and help that handler do things the disability prevents.

Hearing Assistance

Hearing dogs are trained to support the needs of severely hearing-impaired people. They serve as their handlers ears and provide the added benefit of companionship. Hearing dogs are trained to alert their owners to common sounds like doorbells, oven timers, smoke alarms, telephones, babies’ cries, the handlers name being spoken or alarm clocks. Hearing dogs make physical contact with their masters, nudging or pawing them to get their attention and are trained to lead their handlers toward the source of a sound if necessary.

Outside the home, hearing dogs may also perform additional tasks. Hearing impaired people cannot always assess what is behind them or beyond their peripheral vision. A hearing dog is trained to watch for other people coming from behind and the sides and alert the handler that this is happening. Hearing assistance dogs may also be trained in crowd control, finding exits and vehicles or alerting their handler to the approach of machinery or bicycles.
In the home, the most important task a hearing assistance dog can perform, is waking up their person to an emergency or potentially dangerous sound. That means that even in sleep, a hearing assistance dog must be aware of the environment and any changes in it, be willing to wake up and then wake the hearing-impaired owner. 

Medical Alert

Service dogs bring freedom to their partners 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. A person partnered with a service dog has full public access rights as granted by federal law (The Americans With Disabilities Act), which allows them to take their dog into all public facilities. Service dogs are never separated from their human partners! A competent service dog program spends two years preparing each dog for its working life. Service dogs must be physically sound, temperamentally stable, happy working partners.

Medical Detection and Alert Dogs use their incredible noses to sense bio-chemical changes in your body. Every change has an attached smell. If we can isolate that smell, we can train your dog to detect it, alert you to its presence and help you reduce the effects of whatever condition is causing it.

A trained service animal can save your life. Whether it’s by catching a whiff of nuts that could kill a person with a severe airborne allergy, detecting low blood sugar, or even recognizing heart abnormalities that could signal a heart attack, the incredibly sensitive canine sense of smell can work wonders.

Medical alert dogs can warn their owners about impending crisis situations in a variety of illnesses. These include diabetes, heart disease, airborne allergies, asthma, illnesses that cause dizziness or potential loss of consciousness when standing, and many others. And whether or not the animal detects the emergency in advance, they can provide a quick, targeted medical response unique to the individual’s needs.

Finding Lost Pets

In traditional Search and Rescue work, trained search dogs sniff out missing people following each person's distinctive scent. It is no different with lost pet detection work. Each pet has a unique smell, just like humans. Training a dog to find a lost pet is all about the nose.

Up to 8 million animals end up in shelters, though not all of these are strays, according to the Humane Society of the United States. Of stray animals that are brought to a shelter, up to 30 percent of dogs are eventually returned to their owner, while only about 5 percent of cats make it home. For frantic owners of a missing pet, there's a good reason to call a professional. Up to 50 percent of all unclaimed pets are euthanized, according to the Humane Society. And it's not only runaway canines that get tracked.

Any breed of dog can be a Pet Detective. All dogs have an incredible nose compared to a human, even those breeds with squished snouts. I’ve trained many a boxer mix as Medical Alert Service dogs and they are awesome. Just like with service dogs, a Pet Detective can be any dog with the appropriate temperament. Age is no barrier either. As part of testing the games in this course, games that were created just for this course and not general scent games, I tested on my two 11 year old dogs and the 2 year old. They all were able to find a “lost” pet over several miles and hours of searching. 

Snake Avoidance Without Shock

Dogs instinctively react to sight, sound and smell, and can also be conditioned or trained to react in a specific manner in specific situations. Training a dog to respond to the sight, sound and smell of snakes is not a difficult process. The fantastic abilities of dogs and their noses are used every day in all walks of life. These dogs are trained to detect specific scents and respond in a set pattern based on those scents.

Scent trained dogs save lives daily working with people who are afflicted with seizures, diabetes, cancer, autism and a host of other illnesses. Each change in blood chemistry that our human bodies go through in the course of a day, with changes in health, can be detected by our dogs.

This class teaches your dog to stay at least 5 feet away from a rattlesnake. The program consults your dog’s intelligence, its fantastic nose and its ability to navigate its environment via that nose. Your dog will learn self-control when investigating new or interesting things, impulse control when movement catches its attention and kicks in the need to chase, the understanding of what to do when encountering a specific scent, sight and/or sound and how to alert any humans to the presence of a dangerous animal. 

Boundary Training Without Electronics

Would you like to train your dog to stay in your yard without resorting to electrical shock? There is a way to do it that is inexpensive, takes about the same amount of time, and is just as reliable as the electronic containment systems commercially available.

Wouldn't it be nice to be 100% confident that your dog will stay in your yard even without a fence or leash (ok, 95%)? Is there a room in your house your dog must remain out of, such as baby's room, your formal dining room, or your business office? Are you frustrated with your dog trampling your flowers in the garden you worked so hard on?

There are many ways to contain or control a dog including fences (visible or electronic), chains or tie-outs, pens, leashes, gates, etc. However, none are fool-proof and none truly provide your dog with freedom and a happy life, nor do they teach them anything, only contain them.

Boundary training is an easy and much more reliable alternative. It involves teaching your dog where a boundary line is and that he is not allowed to cross that line, EVER. It's not as hard as it sounds, just takes a little time and consistency. Fifteen or more minutes a day, every day, for a few weeks, and consistent reinforcement after that. Here's how to do it. 

Making Choices, Managing Prey Drive

In this class we will be redirecting and managing prey drive in our dogs. Because of centuries of breeding practices our dogs’ predatory behavior is often incomplete. The result can be a dog that kills or injures a dozen chickens without eating even one.

One of the goals of this class is to train so that your dog is totally used to running away from you at top speed, and then turning on a dime to run *toward* you when you give his recall cue. Once the dog's body is very fluent at switching directions in the middle of a predatory-type chase, you have set up the initial sequence that will create a dog who will “think” first, ask questions second and only move when cued.

The thing a dog finds most satisfying in life is to satisfy their prey drive. That prey drive is made up of several parts, parts which we have bred into our dogs and created specific breeds that concentrate on a specific part of the prey hunting cycle.A dog whose prey drive is engaged will have a much easier time getting along with other dogs, humans, etc.

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